Would You Rather #67: Be rich and have spoiled kids Or be poor and have hardworking and grateful kids? 


Be rich and have spoiled kids or be poor and have hardworking kids?
(c) xcitefun.net

Although I don’t doubt there are some life stories which support the narrative, I also think that assuming a ‘rich’ person’s kids are spoiled brats is more of a stereotype. Not every rich kid ends up lazy and spoiled and not every poor kid grows up to be hardworking and responsible. What children grow up to become is less dependent on their parents’ social status and more on the parenting itself. 

Being described as rich or poor is relative. Someone’s description of ‘rich’ could be another’s ‘middle-class’ where most people fall these days whereas ‘poor’ is usually used to define the working class who may not able to afford a family car or a self-owned house at the moment but poverty is way below that, isn’t it? It’s like poverty has been given a definition upgrade in our society these days. 

There are several inspiring grass-to-grace stories which encourage us to believe in our dreams no matter how unfortunate your background might be. However, there are some people from same backgrounds who are neither hardworking nor grateful for the efforts their parents are making. They resign themselves to having no bright future and thus go around playing truants, petty thieves and neighborhood terrorists for the fun of it. 

There is no guarantee that being poor would make your children hardworking; likewise becoming rich implying raising spoiled kids. Maybe the narrative was so in the 20th century but things are changing now. Parents no matter how successful they are, are training their children to achieve something for themselves and enjoy the fruits of their labor; whiles some ‘poor’ kids are lazing about, thinking their parents owe it to them to help them make it in life. They prefer to blame their situations on their poor background and non-existent family support instead of facing the challenges head on and making something profitable out of their skills and energy.

Poverty is not a good thing; to assume that it is so as to have hardworking children is outrageous. To live a comfortable life should be everyone’s right; yet not an excuse to raise spoiled kids. 

I don’t intend to be poor; neither do I want to raise spoiled kids. I would want to give them the best of opportunities that I wasn’t exposed to growing up but trained to be responsible, hardworking and grateful for the given opportunities and not grow up with a sense of entitlement.

Poverty is terrible; an unfortunate situation many people find themselves in; but should never be a willing choice.

What do you think? Which one would you opt for and why? Kindly share your thoughts.

© Josephine Amoako 2017

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27 Comments Add yours

  1. I believe my children to be reflections of where I am as self no matter what our external conditions are. With that, I make mindful choices every moment to be at peace with what is reflecting back to me when I look at them.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      Good one! Such great perspective! Thanks for sharing that. Much appreciated ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ganzymalgwi says:

    Just as you pointed out not all rich kids are spoiled and not all poor kids are hardworking. It all rest on what the parent teach them and the up bringing of the children that will determine who and what they are.

    Like

  3. deshboss says:

    Well done wonderful post excess sense here! I hope everyone everywhere sees this I’ll do my part and share

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      Thank you! Have a great day!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Debs says:

    Ok, so this calls for some thought and I agree that kids are a reflection of their parents indeed. I would rather be comfortable and raise my kids to becoming a better version of me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      Yep, good call there. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Debs. Have a great day

      Liked by 1 person

  5. gracelarbi says:

    i agree with you on this issue. In fact I have a few examples and like you said, its neither here nor there. You can do all you can for your children, not just in terms of provision and care but even in training, and yet they could come out well or not. Because children as they grow learn and pick habits and attitudes from friends, negative or positive.
    As a parent you can only pray and hope that your children grow to be the best in society and will be responsible adults.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      You’re right… Parents can only pray and do their part to provide and support their children. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Grace. Have a lovely day

      Like

  6. Growing up, I was definitely not rich, but I was definitely spoiled. Even when funds were limited, my mom found a way to give me everything I wanted . . . I’m not super proud of it, and I wish I had been forced to work harder as a kid. I had a tough childhood (I was born visually impaired, and my father died when I was young), so I guess I felt like the world “owed” me good things? I know, it sounds terrible. I was a difficult child, and looking back I feel horrible for my mom.

    I think you need a happy medium. Kids should be able to be kids and have nice things, but they should also be forced to work for those nice things. If I could go back, the number one thing I would have forced myself to do is to get a job in high school. Working in high school would have helped me a lot when I went into the workforce in college.

    Regarding poverty, I don’t think anyone chooses poverty, but those who’ve experienced it feel they have no other choice. I can’t speak from experience, fortunately, and hope that I never will.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      Thanks for sharing your experience, Nicole. Perhaps your mother gave you everything to make up for your visual challenge and I’m glad you learned from that. A happy medium is the best, I agree. 👍

      Like

  7. crystalfoose says:

    I think the status of those around your kids afects them a lot too. If they see a lot of people who seem to have more than they do from luck and not hard-work, they can become resentful and jealous instead of hard-working from being poorer than peers. It is very complex.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      That’s true…. Environment counts as well. Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Crystal ☺

      Like

  8. Jo Smith says:

    I agree with the stereotype! Very true.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      I’m glad you agree, Jo. Thanks for reading ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  9. This is such an interesting question! I want my daughter to have a great life, full of the things I never had (material or otherwise), yet I am a total work horse and want her understand the importance of hard work and diligence. Even if I could give her the world, I would rather give her the tools for her to find her own success.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      That’s the best way to do it, I believe! Thanks for reading and sharing your thoughts, Brittany ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  10. This was a great post! Growing up my family didn’t have much at all. It me me, my mom, and my brother. And she did everything she could to always provide for us and I am so greatful of her and the way my brother and I grown up and turned out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      That’s great! Your mum surely deserves to be appreciated ☺👏

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Interesting question. I like your posts, they make people stop what they’re doing and think. 🙂 In many cases, I think, it depends on the parents, how they teach kids to process information about everything from the surrounding environment. I had my books and I was always lost in them 🙂 So environment wasn’t really important in my case 😂 There were kids who were wealthy, poor and in between in high school, and all had different caracters. In this case, I guess the world is made of shades of gray 🙂

    Like

    1. joseyphina says:

      You’re right; the world is indeed in different shades. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I’m glad you enjoy the questions☺

      Like

  12. Growing up we were poor, I can’t lie. My mother was a teen mom and had my twin sister and I at 16. We struggled like hell. There were days we had nothing to eat and all we had to drink was water from the pipe. But through that struggle, my mother taught as to be humble and grateful. Even though we were poor, she taught us the importance of giving. If all you had left was one dollar she believed that giving it to someone who neeed it more was the right thing to do. We still carry that mindset to this day. Now being a mother, I try my best not to struggle the way my mother did but I know that if I were to, the values I instill in my girls will make a difference. I too believe that parents, rather than circumstances, mold children.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      Wow… Inspiring. And you’re right. It’s the values instilled in kids that matters not necessarily circumstances. Thanks for sharing your experience. ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  13. This is one of the biggest worries I have as a parent! Even as a baby, I really limit the gifts that my son gets and try to expose him to as many different cultures as I can.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      Way to go, Laura! 👍

      Like

  14. There is something to be said when kids are taught that if they want something they have to earn it. I was definitely raised in a home like this and yes, there were times I was spoiled and my mom got me things, but we were far from rich in a money sense. However, I feel like I am rich, because of the relationship I have with my parents and the level of appreciation I have for them for teaching me what the value of a dollar means. I am so grateful for it. I’ve seen too many of my friends and family where they didn’t get taught this life lesson and once they entered into adulthood, they completely crumbled and its hard to watch.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. joseyphina says:

      Very well said. Thanks for sharing your insight.

      Liked by 1 person

Thanks for reading; would love to read your thoughts!

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